Any parent in California knows that teenagers, being inexperienced behind the wheel, are more liable to be in a crash than adults are. The risk goes up even more during what are called the 100 deadliest days, which span from Memorial Day to Labor Day. Between 2008 and 2018, more than 8,300 people died in crashes with teen drivers during the 100 deadliest days.

Teens are already known for their risky behavior behind the wheel. In a AAA Traffic Safety Culture Index, 72% of respondents aged 16 to 18 admitted to driving negligently in the past 30 days. One in four drove drowsy, 31% drove aggressively and 32% ran red lights. Speeding in a residential area (47%) and on the freeway (40%) were the most frequently reported forms of negligence.

Parents should be able to talk with their teens about why these and other negligent or reckless acts put them and others in danger. To ensure their safety during the 100 deadliest days, parents should form a set of driving rules for their teens and, of course, set a good example themselves. AAA recommends that parents give at least 50 hours of in-vehicle coaching to their teens, and it offers various lesson plans to help in this. Teens may also be enrolled in a driver education program.

When drivers, whatever their age, cause car collisions through their own fault, the victims may seek compensation from the responsible party’s auto insurance provider. Filing a claim can be hard without a lawyer, so victims may want to see one for a case evaluation. If the case holds up under the state’s negligence laws, the lawyer may take it on, even speaking on victims’ behalf for a settlement. The lawyer may prepare the case for court if one cannot be achieved.