California residents who received a blow or jolt to the head, whether in a car crash or a sports-related incident, should know that they may have incurred a traumatic brain injury. TBIs range from mild to severe, but the symptoms are consistent and fall under four categories.

First, there are the mental symptoms like difficulty thinking clearly and concentrating, difficulty remembering new things and a general feeling that one’s thinking has become slow. Second, there are physical symptoms like headaches, blurred vision, nausea, dizziness, chronic fatigue, trouble balancing one’s self and sensitivity to light and noise.

Emotional symptoms are not uncommon and range from increased sadness to irritability and anxiety. Lastly, there are sleep-related symptoms. One may sleep more than usual, less than usual or only after a prolonged period when they have trouble falling asleep.

Symptoms may not appear until days or weeks after the injury, and those with concussions, or mild TBIs, are likely to ignore their symptoms precisely because they are so mild. Some symptoms, though, indicate the need for immediate medical attention. Examples include a headache that gets progressively worse, repeated vomiting, slurred speech, convulsions and loss of consciousness.

Young children who show the above symptoms need medical attention. The same goes for when they will not nurse or eat or stop crying.

Many brain injury cases end in high settlements because the victims suffered permanent disabilities. Every TBI case is different, though, so victims who want to seek compensation may want a lawyer to assess it. Success will largely depend on how clearly the other side, be it a driver or one’s employer, was at fault. The lawyer may bring in medical experts, investigators and other third parties to build up the case before going on to settlement negotiations.